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Intro to Varicose Veins

Vein care can range from small, unsightly Spider Veins that appear just under your skin to more serious conditions like Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) or Phlebitis that can jeopardize your life. It’s not just skin deep. You’re probably familiar with the outward appearance of issues such as varicose veins, lumpy veins, and spider veins, but

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Deep Vein Thrombosis

Deep venous thrombosis, (DVT) is the formation of a blood clot (thrombus) in a deep vein, predominantly in the legs. There are two types of veins in the leg; superficial veins and deep veins. Superficial veins lie just below the skin and are easily seen on the surface. Deep veins are located deep within the

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Leg Edema

Leg edema is a result of excess interstitial fluid accumulating in one or both legs. It may affect just the foot and ankle or extend to the thigh and may be slight or dramatic and pitting or nonpitting. Leg edema may result from venous disorders, trauma, and certain bone and cardiac disorders that disturb normal

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Leg Skin Changes

The skin changes associated with chronic venous insufficiency are sometimes called venous stasis dermatitis and are the result of long term venous reflux, swelling and increased pressure in the veins. Eventually the constant increased pressure and swelling causes the skin to become damaged and inflamed (cellulitis) The skin eventually becomes reddish brown, hard, thick, leathery,

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Spider Veins

Varicose Veins What’s the difference between Spider Veins and Varicose Veins? Spider veins are small red, blue or purple veins on the surface of the skin. Varicose veins are larger distended veins that are located somewhat deeper than spider veins. Arteries bring blood from the heart to the extremities, veins, which have one-way valves, channel

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Varicose Veins

Spider veins are small red, blue or purple veins on the surface of the skin. Varicose veins are larger distended veins that are located somewhat deeper than spider veins. Arteries bring blood from the heart to the extremities, veins, which have one-way valves, channel blood back to the heart. If the valves don’t function well,

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Venous Insufficiency

Venous insufficiency occurs when forward flow through the veins is obstructed, as in the case of a blood clot, or if there is backward leakage of blood flow through damaged valves. What are the symptoms of venous insufficiency? In healthy veins, there is continuous flow of blood from the limbs back toward the heart. There

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Heart Valve Disease

The heart has two halves, a left and a right, each with two chambers – the atrium and the ventricle. Between the chambers are the heart valves which ensure the blood runs only in one direction.   There are also heart valves situated between the ventricles and the major arteries – the aorta and pulmonary

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Arrhythmia

An arrhythmia is a problem with the rate or rhythm of the heartbeat. During an arrhythmia, the heart can beat too fast, too slow, or with an irregular rhythm.   A heartbeat that is too fast is called tachycardia A heartbeat that is too slow is called bradycardia. Most arrhythmias are harmless, but some can

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Heart Failure

Chest Pain and Heart Failure If you are having severe pain, crushing, squeezing, or pressure in your chest that lasts more than a few minutes, or if the pain moves into your neck, left shoulder, arm, or jaw, go immediately to a hospital emergency department. Do not drive yourself. Call 911 for emergency transport. Chest

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